Second Language Acquisition

The study of second language acquisition (SLA) is an increasingly interdisciplinary field that draws on various branches of linguistics as well as cognitive psychology, educational research, sociology, and neurology to describe exactly how second languages are learned by different individuals in different contexts, and to explain the biological, cognitive, and social mechanisms underlying these phenomena. Factors commonly studied include the role of instruction, age, aptitude, native language, universal grammar, communicative practice, and sociolinguistic context.

Some students also pursue a certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the Department of Linguistics. 

Multiple research clusters fall under the Second Language Acquisition ARCO.

Second Language Acquisition

Language processing and working memory 

People in Second Language Acquisition:

Professor
Assistant Professor
Senior Lecturer
Professor of foreign language education, linguistics, and French
Professor of psychology and linguistics
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Post-doctoral researcher
PhD Student, Mellon Fellow
PhD Student
PhD Student
PhD Student, Lawler Fellow

Bilingualism

Multilingualism is the use of two or more languages, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population. More than half of all Europeans claim to speak at least one other language in addition to their mother tongue. Multilingualism is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness. Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.

People in Bilingualism:

Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
PhD Student

Language Contact

We Investigate the evolution of language due to contact between different languages. Languages can come into contact in a variety of ways, such as direct contact between speakers of different languages (e.g., migration, invasion, slavery) and indirect contact, with no contact between speakers of different languages (through media). The outcomes of contact are varied and include pidgin or creole formation, bilingualism, language death, language attrition, code-switching, and borrowing.

People in Language Contact:

Associate Professor
Visiting Lecturer
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
PhD Student
PhD Student

Prosody & Intonation

In linguistics, intonation is variation of spoken pitch that is not used to distinguish words; instead it is used for a range of functions such as indicating the attitudes and emotions of the speaker, signalling the difference between statements and questions, and between different types of questions, focusing attention on important elements of the spoken message and also helping to regulate conversational interaction. It contrasts with tone, in which pitch variation in some languages distinguishes words, either lexically or grammatically. 

People in Prosody & Intonation:

Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
PhD Student
PhD Student